Spiritual Museum 3.0: Stroke of genius or marketing spin?

Herman Kartajaya has managed to position himself as a marketing guru to Indonesia and an international audience, although Unspun, probably because of low intellectual capacity has never really understood what he’s on about. Now, swimming into the blue ocean of a 3.0 world while the rest of us are stuck in 2.0 Hermawan aims to curate corporeal marketing.

Stroke of marketing genius or chutzpah-meets-snake-oil-salesmanship?

 

Spiritual Museum 3.0 Now Present in Ubud

Ubud is really a beautiful destination for tourists. Moreover, the destination showing intense nuance of Balinese culture has now been enriched with a museum of Spiritual Marketing 3.0.

“Existence of this museum will certainly make Ubud more interesting and unique. Likewise, Ubud will also be better known due to the Museum of Marketing 3.0 initiated by Hermawan Kartajaya, a top marketing expert of this country,” said senior figure of Ubud Royal Palace doubling as the Regent of Gianyar Cok Oka Ardhana Sukawati on the sidelines of the inauguration of the museum on Friday (May 27).

Cok Ace as he familiarly greeted said the construction of the museum was solely intended to strengthen Ubud as a tourist destination. The book entitled Marketing 3.0: From Products to Customers to Human Spirit written by Philip Kotler, Hermawan Kartajaya and Iwan Setiawan was recently published by John Wiley & Sons in May 2010. The book described how the marketing moved beyond the mind and hearts of consumers and got into the human soul.

Hermawan accompanied by senior figure of Ubud Royal Palace, stated that marketing often had a bad connotation in relation to product promotion activities having the ultimate goal to generate profits. To improve the image, the book has contained comprehensive description on spiritual marketing and sympathetic business. The iconic title ‘3.0’ indicated that marketing activities should move beyond the era of rational (1.0) and emotional (2.0) into the era of spiritual marketing (3.0).

Read more at Bali Travel News

Goobledygook marketing?

Received this in the mail some time ago. Did not and still do not know what to make of it.

If they can’t get their English right, should they use Indonesian instead? And what sort of marketing messages about themselves is this email invite supposed to send anyway?

 

Tempo English Edition misses a couple of beats

Must be a particularly bad month for Tempo’s English Edition. Unspun came back to the office to be greeted as a “values customer” receiving a later than usual copy of Tempo which features as cover story “forner” Tax Chief Hadi Purnomo under scrutiny. Wonder what sort of scrutiny the check sub gave to that edition.

How to keep it real as marketers zoom in on Twitterville?

Now that marketers have wised up to the fact that Twitter is a viable channel for them to reach their markets, the space is beginning to be filled by noise of competitions and a race to have as many hashtags as possible mentioning their brand, product and campaign.

How can clients, consultants and social media users themselves keep the social media experience real for themselves and others? Hanny discusses the issues in Talking Points below.

clipped from www.maverick.co.id

You might have noticed the signs in Indonesia’s Twitterverse.

Of late, Tweeps seem to be getting more easily annoyed with Twitter campaigns/ competitions that require contestants to flood their timeline with RT and #hashtags. They are also becoming more critical in spotting ”advertweetments”–poorly disguised advertisements tweeted by influential Twitter users/rainmakers.

The result is that social media users–including me–have become more skeptical toward brands/companies/Tweeps who are now racing full speed to establish their presences in social media.

The problem, however, is that through such practices they end up annoying their audiences; because they are serving up exactly the same things that people go into social media to avoid — annoying and intrusive marketing, usually in the form of advertisements and endorsements, in traditional media.

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Mammon and the New Media in Indonesia

In Talking Points Unspun’s alter ego makes the observation that Indonesian has entered into an interesting phase where marketers have suddenly woken up to the potential of New Media. They are enlisting the help of Digital Influencers but are they all going about it in a way that would benefit the brands, their customers and, most of all, the Digital Influencers themselves?

Are digital influencers selling out to Mammon?

March 25th, 2010 | No Comments »

Posted in Brands & Marketing, English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends |

I checked my Facebook account today and found that I had some invites from several prominent online presences (read: Twitterers and bloggers who are quite well known and therefore potentially influential).

Many of them are good friends or at least acquaintances with established Net identities/personas. So it was a bit surprising to see what they were inviting me to join. The invites were actually for products or brands that were irrelevant to what they themselves usually blogged or Twitted about.

It was as if I woke up to read in the papers that a sports editor in an influential newspaper had written a review on the Cobra Starship concert for the newspaper’s music column.

Something wasn’t right.

The reasonable inference from this spate of invites is that the Indonesian marketing communications community has come to the conclusion that new media–Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social network platforms–matters. And that they need to get in there to secure their share of voice.

Read more

Mammon and the New Media in Indonesia

In Talking Points Unspun’s alter ego makes the observation that Indonesian has entered into an interesting phase where marketers have suddenly woken up to the potential of New Media. They are enlisting the help of Digital Influencers but are they all going about it in a way that would benefit the brands, their customers and, most of all, the Digital Influencers themselves?

Are digital influencers selling out to Mammon?

March 25th, 2010 | No Comments »

Posted in Brands & Marketing, English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends |

I checked my Facebook account today and found that I had some invites from several prominent online presences (read: Twitterers and bloggers who are quite well known and therefore potentially influential).

Many of them are good friends or at least acquaintances with established Net identities/personas. So it was a bit surprising to see what they were inviting me to join. The invites were actually for products or brands that were irrelevant to what they themselves usually blogged or Twitted about.

It was as if I woke up to read in the papers that a sports editor in an influential newspaper had written a review on the Cobra Starship concert for the newspaper’s music column.

Something wasn’t right.

The reasonable inference from this spate of invites is that the Indonesian marketing communications community has come to the conclusion that new media–Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social network platforms–matters. And that they need to get in there to secure their share of voice.

Read more

SBY’s skills as Political Communicator of the Year revealed!

Know Ye O Mortals, especially in Indonesia, that there is one who walks among you with the gift of the silver tongue, whose words of wisdom buoy you to the highest levels of commitment and devotion.

Such a man is not easily understood and is quite reviled at home among the Chattering Classes but actually appreciated aboard, especially by the High Priests of the arcane arts of Public Affairs, who recently voted him COMMUNICATOR OF THE YEAR.

Now gaze on his wondrous video-taped acceptance speech to Public Affairs Asia and learn the many skills he employs to become a revered communicator.

For an earlier posting of how SBY beat out Pretty Boy Abhisit for the title, and to vote on your choice of Communicator of the Year go here.