Tag: New Media

Nestle getting away with it in Asia?

Nestle harvested a storm of protests in the West when it mishandled the Sinar Mas issue on social media. Yet it got away relatively scott free in Asia, or so the industry voices including Unspun’s alter ego think in this article in Media:

Apathy reigns in Asia over Nestle’s saga and social media mess

28-Apr-10, 12:44

Thanks to Facebook and other social media channels, Nestlé has in recent weeks had to deal with an enormous public relations mess, the source of which lay deep in the Indonesian rainforest. But as international condemnation grows, why has the region stayed silent?

The trigger for the controversy is by now well known – an online video posted by Greenpeace featuring an office worker accidentally biting into an orangutan finger instead of a Kit Kat. The video was designed to draw attention to the NGO’s battle with Nestlé over its relationship with Indonesian company Sinar Mas Group, which has been accused of illegal deforestation of rainforests – the habitat of orangutans.

The food giant flexed its muscles and managed to get the Greenpeace video removed from YouTube, a step that angered thousands of consumers, prompting them to take on the company through Twitter and on its Facebook fan page. The inept handling of social media channels by a Nestlé representative attracted a barrage of negative comments. Nestlé has since admitted it has learnt a big lesson from its social media ineptness and accepted that that it is still “learning about how best to use social media”.

But while the incident has inflamed online passions in the West, it does not seem to have affected the average Asian consumer too much. The two largest producers of palm oil globally – Indonesia and Malaysia – have been relatively unaffected by the controversy, with no serious protests covered in the local media or in the social media space. And although Nestlé has been forced to bow to international online pressure, the incident has so far had little impact on palm oil production or indeed government legislation in these two countries.

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Twitter trending topic Panasonic Gobel another sign of Indonesia’s cutting edg in new media?

The article below from TechCrunch is yet another testimony of how active Indonesians are in new media. Apparently Indonesia is the world’s fourth largest source of Tweets – after the US, Japan and Brazil.

Unspun doesn’t have the stats, but there seems to be lots of anecdotal evidence that , what’s happening in the social network and new media scene in Indonesia is much, much more active than in other markets, and there’s a chance that some of the work being done in Indonesia where new media is concerned is pretty cutting edge, or at least second to none. If true then marketers and corporations operating here have no business ignoring the new media. What do others think?

Why The Hell Was Panasonic Gobel Trending on Twitter? Blame Indonesia

by Evelyn Rusli on Mar 26, 2010

Your first question is probably what the hell is a “Gobel” and will it rival Foursquare?  Not quite. It’s Panasonic’s subsidiary in Indonesia and it was also a top trending topic on Twitter this morning, along with RCTI and Putra Nababan. All three are Indonesian (RCTI is an Indonesian television station and Putra Nababan is a popular TV host on RCTI) and all are connected to the apparently very popular 13th annual Panasonic Gobel Awards (celebrates TV and broadcasting achievements)— essentially Indonesia’s version of the Emmys. At last count, the number of tweets on “Panasonic Gobel” exceeded 4,500, according to Google. So why do we care?

Well if you’re a venture capitalist, an entrepreneur or a corporation you should care a lot. Because it illustrates the incredible power of the Indonesian internet consumer, or rather their consumer in general. Indonesia is undergoing a period of growth (it grew 4.5% last year during the global financial crisis) but has largely flown under the radar— despite housing more than 230 million people and being the fourth most populated country in the world. Of course, Indonesia is still struggling with high unemployment and poverty but like China and India it has a growing middle class that is spending more time on the internet, especially on social media sites like Twitter. To put this power in perspective: For a few hours this morning, Panasonic’s name was on the homepage of every Twitter user that logged on.

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Mammon and the New Media in Indonesia

In Talking Points Unspun’s alter ego makes the observation that Indonesian has entered into an interesting phase where marketers have suddenly woken up to the potential of New Media. They are enlisting the help of Digital Influencers but are they all going about it in a way that would benefit the brands, their customers and, most of all, the Digital Influencers themselves?

Are digital influencers selling out to Mammon?

March 25th, 2010 | No Comments »

Posted in Brands & Marketing, English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends |

I checked my Facebook account today and found that I had some invites from several prominent online presences (read: Twitterers and bloggers who are quite well known and therefore potentially influential).

Many of them are good friends or at least acquaintances with established Net identities/personas. So it was a bit surprising to see what they were inviting me to join. The invites were actually for products or brands that were irrelevant to what they themselves usually blogged or Twitted about.

It was as if I woke up to read in the papers that a sports editor in an influential newspaper had written a review on the Cobra Starship concert for the newspaper’s music column.

Something wasn’t right.

The reasonable inference from this spate of invites is that the Indonesian marketing communications community has come to the conclusion that new media–Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social network platforms–matters. And that they need to get in there to secure their share of voice.

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Mammon and the New Media in Indonesia

In Talking Points Unspun’s alter ego makes the observation that Indonesian has entered into an interesting phase where marketers have suddenly woken up to the potential of New Media. They are enlisting the help of Digital Influencers but are they all going about it in a way that would benefit the brands, their customers and, most of all, the Digital Influencers themselves?

Are digital influencers selling out to Mammon?

March 25th, 2010 | No Comments »

Posted in Brands & Marketing, English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends |

I checked my Facebook account today and found that I had some invites from several prominent online presences (read: Twitterers and bloggers who are quite well known and therefore potentially influential).

Many of them are good friends or at least acquaintances with established Net identities/personas. So it was a bit surprising to see what they were inviting me to join. The invites were actually for products or brands that were irrelevant to what they themselves usually blogged or Twitted about.

It was as if I woke up to read in the papers that a sports editor in an influential newspaper had written a review on the Cobra Starship concert for the newspaper’s music column.

Something wasn’t right.

The reasonable inference from this spate of invites is that the Indonesian marketing communications community has come to the conclusion that new media–Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social network platforms–matters. And that they need to get in there to secure their share of voice.

Read more

Is Foursquare the next Facebook for Indonesia?

Talking Points examines a social network called Foursquare that seems to have had quite a take up in Indonesia recently.

The location-based platform is addictive, has incentives built in and, interestingly, has great potential for businesses wanting to engage their audiences via new media.

What makes Foursquare popular, what is it all about and how can businesses benefit from it? Read what Nena has to say in the article below:

Foursquare: The Next Big Thing?

Setelah Twitter, baru-baru ini Jakarta (bahkan mungkin Indonesia) kembali terkena demam situs jejaring sosial. Kali ini bukan lagi micro-blogging, melainkan layanan berbasis lokasi yang memanfaatkan lokasi kita sebagai basis informasi. Ya, aplikasi baru ini bernama Foursquare.

Sekitar 2 minggu belakangan, Foursquare marak digunakan oleh banyak onliners di Jakarta dan di kota-kota besar lain seperti Yogyakarta dan Surabaya. Pada dasarnya yang dilakukan di Foursquare adalah check-in di lokasi kita – bisa berupa gedung, kantor, restoran, tempat makan, atau bahkan jalan. Tempat yang belum ada di database (yang juga datang dari para pengguna), dapat ditambahkan sendiri sehingga membuat pengguna merasa “memiliki” tempat tersebut dan interaksinya lebih dinamis.

Di Jakarta, sudah ada cukup banyak pengguna Foursquare, dan sudah ada banyak sekali venue yang ada. Di daerah Senopati saja sudah ada Maverick, salon Roger, Soto Ambengan Cak Di, Nasi Goreng Cabe Rawit Jalan Daksa, Bakso Joni, Nenen Baby Shop, dan masih banyak lagi. Ketika melintas di daerah Kuningan, sudah ada venue Perempatan Kuningan, dan bagi Anda yang sering naik Metro Mini 69, sudah ada Metro Mini 69 tercatat sebagai venue di Foursquare.

Hal-hal ini menunjukkan bahwa respon pengguna di Jakarta cukup positif dan mereka juga antusias dan aktif menambahkan berbagai venue baru. Interaksi verbal antarpengguna memang relatif minim – karena hanya dilakukan lewat sebuah “shout” sebanyak maksimal 140 karakter. Namun, interaksi nonverbal dilakukan lewat dua cara: check-in di suatu lokasi dan kompetisi dalam hal badge, poin, dan menjadi Mayor.

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Strange tune: Unknown 1960s Russian singer makes it big among Indonesian onliners

Why is the Indonesian online community paying undue attention to this 1960s Russian singer who, in this very aged clip, sings with a wooden face with lyrics no profounder than trolololololo?

Find out how and why this video became viral in Indonesia’s Twitterverse in Talking Points.

Parents, Sex Predators and Children on Facebook

Hurrah for the parents trying to protect their children from sex offenders on the Net. But the question that needs to be asked is: were the parents negligent in the first place in allowing their children to open Facebook accounts in the first place?

Unspun‘s met many parents who speak with great pride of the ability of the apple of their eyes’ great ability to log in and play around the Net. They huff and they puff about how tech savvy their children are.

Unspun and the missues usually listen in dismay as we hold the view that children are best kept out of the Net until they are old enough to fend for themselves.

This does not mean that we make the Unspunlet a Luddite. On the contrary we encourage him, all eight years, to know his way around the computer and some selected sites. But we try our best to keep Unspunlet’s photo and name out of the public domain as much as possible. The Net can be a really dangerous place as very, very smart and crafty paedophiles and criminals can lurk around, comfortable in the anonymity that the Net provides.

We think that perhaps 13 or 14 may be an appropriate age to start allowing him some supervised web presence but then again we are not very sure. What we are sure is that 8 is still too young for him to fly solo into the Internet wilderness.

So far Unspunlet does not show any signs of deprivation. He’s happy and as normal a boy can be at his age with an Unspun as his father. Kids do not really need to go social networking tht early in life and parents who encourage their children to do so are beling irresposible.

This extract from The Jakarta Globe today:

Parents Log On to Facebook to Protect Their Children From Sexual Predators

As police investigate several recent cases involving sexual predators on Facebook, concerned parents across Jakarta are taking matters into their own hands to protect their children — even if it means violating their privacy.

Nanni Purnama, an East Jakarta mother of three, including two teenage girls, told the Jakarta Globe that she already had access to her children’s accounts on the popular social networking site.

“I know their passwords,” she said. “They also have access to each other’s Facebook accounts.”

“I want all three of them to be open to their parents, as well as to their siblings. I have to know who their friends are and what they put up on Facebook,” she added.

Nanni said she also conducted periodical “surprise inspections” of her children’s cellphones, reading through their text messages and going over their incoming and outgoing calls.

“I am doing this to protect my children from those who have the power to harm them,” she said. “They should have nothing to hide from me.”

Nanni’s youngest child, Fathur, 12, said that unlike his sisters, Irin, 17, and Bella, 15, the only reason he had a Facebook account was because he was asked to open one as part of his computer class at school.

“My mother does not allow me to confirm friend requests on Facebook from people I don’t know,” he said. “All my Facebook friends are just friends from school or from extracurricular activities, such as futsal.”

Evie Komarwati, a mother of four, including a 15-year-old boy and a 17-year-old girl, said she had taught all of her children to have zero tolerance for strangers on Facebook.

“I recently opened a Facebook account myself — I needed to know how it works,” she said.

via Parents Log On to Facebook to Protect Their Children From Sexual Predators – The Jakarta Globe.

Getting Lunatic over infotainment journos

Apart from the fact that Luna Maya is probably justified to vent her anger at Indonesia’s equivalent to the paparazzi , Unspun‘s always wondered why those reporters are called infotainment journalists.

Why infotainment? The cover the entertainment so shouldn’t they be called entertainment journalists? Unspun wonders what’s the etymology of infotainment. How did that word creep into the Indonesian vocabulary.

Indonesian actress Luna Maya closed her Twitter account after launching a tirade against infotainment reporters.  (Photo: SP File)

Indonesian Celebrity Luna Maya Shuts Twitter Account After Infotainment Prostitute Slur

An Indonesian celebrity has been threatened with legal action by a journalist’s association and has closed her Twitter account following backlash against a heated message where she labeled infotainment television program crews as being “lower than prostitutes.”

Luna Maya, a television presenter, model and actress, apologized to her Twitter followers before closing her account, under the username lunmay, permanently after the outburst.

In a message posted on Tuesday night, she wrote: “Infotainment are LOWER than PROSTITUTES, MURDERERS!!!!! May your soul burn in hell!!!”

“I’m sorry everyone for the unimportant tweet. I thank those of you who understand (my reasons) and for those who don’t, I apologize,” Luna wrote on her Twitter account on Wednesday.

Luna was believed to have written the harsh Twitter message after being mobbed by crew members of infotainment television shows after she attended the premiere of the film “Sang Perimpi” (“The Dreamer”) at EX Plaza in Central Jakarta on Tuesday night.

Luna, who is in a relationship with singer songwriter Ariel from the band Peterpan, was watching the film with Ariel’s daughter from a previous marriage, Alleia, and his father.

When Luna left the movie theater carrying Alleia, who had fallen asleep during the film, the actress alleged that one of the infotainment crew members bumped Alleia’s head with their camera in the jostle for photographs and interviews. Luna had allegedly already asked the infotainment reporters to wait in the lobby at EX Plaza where she would give an interview.

After the incident, Luna vented her anger on her Twitter account at midnight.

Her comments sparked backlash from her followers.

via Indonesian Celebrity Luna Maya Shuts Twitter Account After Infotainment Prostitute Slur – The Jakarta Globe.

A more reliable Indonesia blog ranking system?

Following some discussions in Media-ide and Talking Points about Indonesia’s blog rankings, Patung promised that he would address some of the criticisms in Indonesia Matters‘ blog rankings, which, imperfect as it was, was still the best indicator of a blog’s influence in the Indonesian blogosphere.

Patung‘s made good his promise and the main difference seems to be that he now uses Feedburner rather than Bloglines as one of the parameters. It also adds back Tweets and although it still includes Technorati, the information is not computed in (which is about right since Technorati is on the decline and not relied on much by bloggers to get an indication of a blog’s influence)

Unspun doesn’t know the technicalities of all those ranking stuff but the new list (in which Unspun‘s ranked 10th overall and 2nd in the English blog rankings. woohoo) seems to be more reliable than the last one, which was a bit suss because people who rarely updated the blogs for month still stood quite high in its ranking system.

So the current top 10 are: Indonesia Matters, Anang, Raditya Dika, Ndoro Kakung, Budi Rahardjo, Media-ide, Chicken Strip, Enda NasutionBlog Doctor, and yours truly, Unspun.

Unspun‘s sure that there will be many who will quibble with Patung but as in a recent conversation with some bloggers one of the things we discovered was how difficult it is to set the parameters for blog influence. Do you count the number of visitors, the number of links, the number of conversations, the level of engagements or what. We concluded that perhaps the best system would be a combination of objective parameters and a subjective decision, perhaps by a panel of prominent bloggers, on who’s influential and who not. Even then the garrulous would find grounds to quarrel with the outcome.

Speaking of garrulous, Unspun‘s sure that the new rankings, especially where the English blogs are concerned, would certainly put some noses out of joint. Said persons would then likely profess to the world that they really, really place no importance on such superfluous things in life as blog rankings as they write for themselves and not for some online popularity sweepstakes. LOL if you should hear such protestations as methinks such bloggers protest too much. They are as vain as any of us (yes, Unspun included) bloggers when it comes to rankings. Even when we do not take such things too seriously we gotta admit that some sort of recognition feels good, even if we labor for love.