Nestle getting away with it in Asia?

Nestle harvested a storm of protests in the West when it mishandled the Sinar Mas issue on social media. Yet it got away relatively scott free in Asia, or so the industry voices including Unspun’s alter ego think in this article in Media:

Apathy reigns in Asia over Nestle’s saga and social media mess

28-Apr-10, 12:44

Thanks to Facebook and other social media channels, Nestlé has in recent weeks had to deal with an enormous public relations mess, the source of which lay deep in the Indonesian rainforest. But as international condemnation grows, why has the region stayed silent?

The trigger for the controversy is by now well known – an online video posted by Greenpeace featuring an office worker accidentally biting into an orangutan finger instead of a Kit Kat. The video was designed to draw attention to the NGO’s battle with Nestlé over its relationship with Indonesian company Sinar Mas Group, which has been accused of illegal deforestation of rainforests – the habitat of orangutans.

The food giant flexed its muscles and managed to get the Greenpeace video removed from YouTube, a step that angered thousands of consumers, prompting them to take on the company through Twitter and on its Facebook fan page. The inept handling of social media channels by a Nestlé representative attracted a barrage of negative comments. Nestlé has since admitted it has learnt a big lesson from its social media ineptness and accepted that that it is still “learning about how best to use social media”.

But while the incident has inflamed online passions in the West, it does not seem to have affected the average Asian consumer too much. The two largest producers of palm oil globally – Indonesia and Malaysia – have been relatively unaffected by the controversy, with no serious protests covered in the local media or in the social media space. And although Nestlé has been forced to bow to international online pressure, the incident has so far had little impact on palm oil production or indeed government legislation in these two countries.

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How a cinema blitzed its critics with social media

The Alter Ego has written a piece in Talking Points about how Blitz Megaplex is using social media to successfully engage its audiences and critics instead of pumping out marketing messages and organizing inane contests on the Web. See here

Twitter trending topic Panasonic Gobel another sign of Indonesia’s cutting edg in new media?

The article below from TechCrunch is yet another testimony of how active Indonesians are in new media. Apparently Indonesia is the world’s fourth largest source of Tweets – after the US, Japan and Brazil.

Unspun doesn’t have the stats, but there seems to be lots of anecdotal evidence that , what’s happening in the social network and new media scene in Indonesia is much, much more active than in other markets, and there’s a chance that some of the work being done in Indonesia where new media is concerned is pretty cutting edge, or at least second to none. If true then marketers and corporations operating here have no business ignoring the new media. What do others think?

Why The Hell Was Panasonic Gobel Trending on Twitter? Blame Indonesia

by Evelyn Rusli on Mar 26, 2010

Your first question is probably what the hell is a “Gobel” and will it rival Foursquare?  Not quite. It’s Panasonic’s subsidiary in Indonesia and it was also a top trending topic on Twitter this morning, along with RCTI and Putra Nababan. All three are Indonesian (RCTI is an Indonesian television station and Putra Nababan is a popular TV host on RCTI) and all are connected to the apparently very popular 13th annual Panasonic Gobel Awards (celebrates TV and broadcasting achievements)— essentially Indonesia’s version of the Emmys. At last count, the number of tweets on “Panasonic Gobel” exceeded 4,500, according to Google. So why do we care?

Well if you’re a venture capitalist, an entrepreneur or a corporation you should care a lot. Because it illustrates the incredible power of the Indonesian internet consumer, or rather their consumer in general. Indonesia is undergoing a period of growth (it grew 4.5% last year during the global financial crisis) but has largely flown under the radar— despite housing more than 230 million people and being the fourth most populated country in the world. Of course, Indonesia is still struggling with high unemployment and poverty but like China and India it has a growing middle class that is spending more time on the internet, especially on social media sites like Twitter. To put this power in perspective: For a few hours this morning, Panasonic’s name was on the homepage of every Twitter user that logged on.

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Mammon and the New Media in Indonesia

In Talking Points Unspun’s alter ego makes the observation that Indonesian has entered into an interesting phase where marketers have suddenly woken up to the potential of New Media. They are enlisting the help of Digital Influencers but are they all going about it in a way that would benefit the brands, their customers and, most of all, the Digital Influencers themselves?

Are digital influencers selling out to Mammon?

March 25th, 2010 | No Comments »

Posted in Brands & Marketing, English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends |

I checked my Facebook account today and found that I had some invites from several prominent online presences (read: Twitterers and bloggers who are quite well known and therefore potentially influential).

Many of them are good friends or at least acquaintances with established Net identities/personas. So it was a bit surprising to see what they were inviting me to join. The invites were actually for products or brands that were irrelevant to what they themselves usually blogged or Twitted about.

It was as if I woke up to read in the papers that a sports editor in an influential newspaper had written a review on the Cobra Starship concert for the newspaper’s music column.

Something wasn’t right.

The reasonable inference from this spate of invites is that the Indonesian marketing communications community has come to the conclusion that new media–Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social network platforms–matters. And that they need to get in there to secure their share of voice.

Read more

Mammon and the New Media in Indonesia

In Talking Points Unspun’s alter ego makes the observation that Indonesian has entered into an interesting phase where marketers have suddenly woken up to the potential of New Media. They are enlisting the help of Digital Influencers but are they all going about it in a way that would benefit the brands, their customers and, most of all, the Digital Influencers themselves?

Are digital influencers selling out to Mammon?

March 25th, 2010 | No Comments »

Posted in Brands & Marketing, English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends |

I checked my Facebook account today and found that I had some invites from several prominent online presences (read: Twitterers and bloggers who are quite well known and therefore potentially influential).

Many of them are good friends or at least acquaintances with established Net identities/personas. So it was a bit surprising to see what they were inviting me to join. The invites were actually for products or brands that were irrelevant to what they themselves usually blogged or Twitted about.

It was as if I woke up to read in the papers that a sports editor in an influential newspaper had written a review on the Cobra Starship concert for the newspaper’s music column.

Something wasn’t right.

The reasonable inference from this spate of invites is that the Indonesian marketing communications community has come to the conclusion that new media–Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social network platforms–matters. And that they need to get in there to secure their share of voice.

Read more

Is Foursquare the next Facebook for Indonesia?

Talking Points examines a social network called Foursquare that seems to have had quite a take up in Indonesia recently.

The location-based platform is addictive, has incentives built in and, interestingly, has great potential for businesses wanting to engage their audiences via new media.

What makes Foursquare popular, what is it all about and how can businesses benefit from it? Read what Nena has to say in the article below:

Foursquare: The Next Big Thing?

Setelah Twitter, baru-baru ini Jakarta (bahkan mungkin Indonesia) kembali terkena demam situs jejaring sosial. Kali ini bukan lagi micro-blogging, melainkan layanan berbasis lokasi yang memanfaatkan lokasi kita sebagai basis informasi. Ya, aplikasi baru ini bernama Foursquare.

Sekitar 2 minggu belakangan, Foursquare marak digunakan oleh banyak onliners di Jakarta dan di kota-kota besar lain seperti Yogyakarta dan Surabaya. Pada dasarnya yang dilakukan di Foursquare adalah check-in di lokasi kita – bisa berupa gedung, kantor, restoran, tempat makan, atau bahkan jalan. Tempat yang belum ada di database (yang juga datang dari para pengguna), dapat ditambahkan sendiri sehingga membuat pengguna merasa “memiliki” tempat tersebut dan interaksinya lebih dinamis.

Di Jakarta, sudah ada cukup banyak pengguna Foursquare, dan sudah ada banyak sekali venue yang ada. Di daerah Senopati saja sudah ada Maverick, salon Roger, Soto Ambengan Cak Di, Nasi Goreng Cabe Rawit Jalan Daksa, Bakso Joni, Nenen Baby Shop, dan masih banyak lagi. Ketika melintas di daerah Kuningan, sudah ada venue Perempatan Kuningan, dan bagi Anda yang sering naik Metro Mini 69, sudah ada Metro Mini 69 tercatat sebagai venue di Foursquare.

Hal-hal ini menunjukkan bahwa respon pengguna di Jakarta cukup positif dan mereka juga antusias dan aktif menambahkan berbagai venue baru. Interaksi verbal antarpengguna memang relatif minim – karena hanya dilakukan lewat sebuah “shout” sebanyak maksimal 140 karakter. Namun, interaksi nonverbal dilakukan lewat dua cara: check-in di suatu lokasi dan kompetisi dalam hal badge, poin, dan menjadi Mayor.

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Strange tune: Unknown 1960s Russian singer makes it big among Indonesian onliners

Why is the Indonesian online community paying undue attention to this 1960s Russian singer who, in this very aged clip, sings with a wooden face with lyrics no profounder than trolololololo?

Find out how and why this video became viral in Indonesia’s Twitterverse in Talking Points.