My Republic broadband sucks for me. What’s your experience like?

I few months ago we switched from Play Media as a broadband provider because their service sucked – the speeds got slower and there was no good follow-up customer service.

We switched to My Republic because a friend had said that their speeds were rather good. What we found was worse. Not only did the speeds not live up to that advertised. To make things worse not only were the speeds slow

The My Republic/Sinar Was promise: 300Mbps. Weeeeee!

The reality: Not even 2% of the promise where downloads are concerned. Let’s not even talk about the uploads.

the entire connection continuously broke down and the internet connection was sporadic.

We complained on 27th May and was sent he standard line that they’d check the system and get back to us within 1X24 house, and if there was anything wrong, they’d send their technicians to sole the problem in 3X24 hours. Then silence in the 1X24 hours and 3X24 hours period and beyond.

We complained to My Republic again on June 1 and the same thing happened.

So we called again today and we get the same stock answers. This time I put my foot down and asked to speak to the supervisor. After some waiting I spoke to Henny Sahaja (because she won’t give me her full name). She said they needed to forward the complaint to the technical side, who would then inform me in 1X24 hours…

What is it with huge conglomerates like Sinar Mas who, just because they have the money and the know-who, think they can branch into a profitable service industry and make a success of it? They can’t get the infrastructure right, they can’t get the simple customer service right…and the only thing keeping them in business is that they have been around for a long time, have the right connections and the market is so protected against the entry of kick-ass multinational broadband providers.

What I can’t get is whether these people running such sham services have no sense of pride or shame, that they could do such a bad job at it.is there any use bringing into the attention of My Republic outside Indonesia? They didn’t respond to tweets in the past.

So, anyone out there know a reliable, good broadband providers?

 

 

 

 

 

Nestle getting away with it in Asia?

Nestle harvested a storm of protests in the West when it mishandled the Sinar Mas issue on social media. Yet it got away relatively scott free in Asia, or so the industry voices including Unspun’s alter ego think in this article in Media:

Apathy reigns in Asia over Nestle’s saga and social media mess

28-Apr-10, 12:44

Thanks to Facebook and other social media channels, Nestlé has in recent weeks had to deal with an enormous public relations mess, the source of which lay deep in the Indonesian rainforest. But as international condemnation grows, why has the region stayed silent?

The trigger for the controversy is by now well known – an online video posted by Greenpeace featuring an office worker accidentally biting into an orangutan finger instead of a Kit Kat. The video was designed to draw attention to the NGO’s battle with Nestlé over its relationship with Indonesian company Sinar Mas Group, which has been accused of illegal deforestation of rainforests – the habitat of orangutans.

The food giant flexed its muscles and managed to get the Greenpeace video removed from YouTube, a step that angered thousands of consumers, prompting them to take on the company through Twitter and on its Facebook fan page. The inept handling of social media channels by a Nestlé representative attracted a barrage of negative comments. Nestlé has since admitted it has learnt a big lesson from its social media ineptness and accepted that that it is still “learning about how best to use social media”.

But while the incident has inflamed online passions in the West, it does not seem to have affected the average Asian consumer too much. The two largest producers of palm oil globally – Indonesia and Malaysia – have been relatively unaffected by the controversy, with no serious protests covered in the local media or in the social media space. And although Nestlé has been forced to bow to international online pressure, the incident has so far had little impact on palm oil production or indeed government legislation in these two countries.

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