Connecting Deeper and soaring to great heights at the #APMF2014

Unspun had the privilege to be invited to attend and to speak at the Asia Pacific Media Forum (APMF) 2014, a biennial gathering of creatives, advertising agencies, media houses, publishers and advertisers from huge brands. And what a privilege it was!

It was what a convention is supposed to be – meticulous organisation, an eclectic and impressive list of international and local speakers from government with one or two musicians thrown in to spice things up, world class creatives and specialists with insights to share about the developments taking place in measurement, analytics and technology.

Throughout the two-day convention the speakers were almost always on topic and did not, like it is so common in other seminars in Indonesia, engage in hard selling. They were all there to share their insights and thoughts on what’s happening in their respective areas.

The convention actually began on the eve of the opening, at a welcoming dinner for the almost 700 attendees hosted by tycoon Harry Tanoe from the MNC Group where everyone got a chance to mingle, catch up with old friends and make new acquaintances.

The plenary hall of the APMF. http://t.co/kH5Kl3YrnB

Unspun was there for only a short time because he had seen the stage where he and other speakers were to speak from, and the hall at the Bali Nusa Dua Hotel and Convention centre. The size and scale of the stage – think two giant screens and a humoungous stage where you can train for a half marathon on – struck fear into Unspun, who was normally nonchalant about rehearsals.

The sound system was fantastic though and the technicians supporting us were so helpful they saved Unspun’s presentation from disaster by offering to edit  the videos in it.

The next morning and the opening ceremony started a little late with a keynote presentation from Ajaz Ahmed, the CEO and Co-founder of AKQA, a hot name in the creative community. Ajaz had founded the company when he as only 21 and bills itself as the “imaginative appellation of art and science to create beautiful ideas, products and services.” He talked about how to build a company in a time of great change and showcased some of their creative work. Unspun was more impressed musing how someone so young is able to persuade giant companies such as Nike and Red Bull to try out his ideas.

From there one speaker after another was introduced to the stage with a minimum of fuss. Just the name and their title and their topic, without the usual reading of their bios. Something for other conventions to learn here.

Unspun was the warmup speaker for lunch because of the overruns. I spoke on Social Media gone Wild, how wild social media can get where big brands are concerned. Sometimes it is a simple mistake they make or a wrong reaction to social media postings and they suddenly find themselves in a social media maelstrom. Unspun’s advice to the candidates was to incorporate crisis management practices when launching social media campaign. That way if things should go wrong the brand won’t shoot itself in the foot.

Unspun also said that an understated strategy in crisis-like situation, especially when social media – with its ephemeral and fleeting nature in involved – is to keep silent and not react prematurely.

Other speakers that day that impressed Unspun were Facebook’s Indonesia Country Chief Anand Tilak who spoke about the importance of using analytics in trying to make sense of the nation’s Facebook users, who are legion; Kudsia Kahar, the Chief Broadcaster of the The Star Group who spoke about how to deliver great content; and Executive Director and CEO of News Media Association Earl Wilkinson’s delivery on how Legacy Publishers  and how they need to adapt for a brand new audience.

The day’s session ended with a rousing presentation from Abdee from Slank who delivered a touching and electrifying version of Salam Dua Jari and the sardonic Where are you Mr President.

Abdee from Slank energised the audience of 700 with his “Salam Dua Jari”. Photo courtesy of AMPF committee

Pumped up, the attendees then went for an Indonesian dinner hosted by the Kompas Gramedia Group. True to its nature guests were treated to something very Indonesian – lesehan style seating on the floor – and something modern JFlow’s R&B electronic/music.

The next morning started with Chairmon (sic)/Chief Creative Officer of DM9 Merlee Jayme who has so many awards it might take need another posting to complete them all. One intriguing idea that Unspun got out of her presentation was that there was nothing stopping the creative agency to come up with a product instead of an advertising or PR campaign idea.

Paramadina University Rector and the founder of Indonesia Mengajar next took to the stage with a heartfelt plea for Indonesians to be more involved in their country, no doubt presaging the Mental Revolution that Jokowi will try to implement when he takes power.

Anies Baswedan:..we all clearly know our roles as husband, father, rector…but what about our role as an Indonesian? Photo courtesy of AMPF committee

Next up with Eric Tohir in his capacity as President of FC Internazionale Milano, explaining ho his acquisition of the football club was also a way of projecting Indonesia’s newfound confidence onto the world stage.

This was followed by the Big Break, an regular feature at the APMF where several startups had five minutes each to pitch themselves to the audience. This year’s candidates were Iphonesia, Marbel, PicMix and Karamel.

Unfortunately Unspun had to leave the APMF at midday to catch a flight and therefore missed two great presentations – according to the Twitter feed that Unspun ws still abel to follow – in the afternoon: That of Bandung Mayor Ridwan Kamil and the legendary storyteller the CEO and Executive Creative Director of Hakuhodo Kettle Kentaro Kimura.

Kentaro Kimura on why 1+1=3. Photo courtesy of @newsplatter

In spite of having to leave early Unspun had benefited so much by being at the APMF. It was a great place to meet people and network; it was very efficiently organised; the speakers and attendees were all taken care of very well; there were great speakers from within and outside Indonesia, and the convention was conducted entirely in English, something that would help this very Indonesian production reach international status soon.

The closing ceremony. Photo courtesy of AMPF committee

And why not, because it was a world class production. Kudos to the organising committee led by Andi Sadha, Ricky Pesik (who sacrificed his birthday and celebrated it early on the second day of the convention), and Jerry Justianto. The convention had truly delivered on its theme of Connecting Deeper.

Nestle getting away with it in Asia?

Nestle harvested a storm of protests in the West when it mishandled the Sinar Mas issue on social media. Yet it got away relatively scott free in Asia, or so the industry voices including Unspun’s alter ego think in this article in Media:

Apathy reigns in Asia over Nestle’s saga and social media mess

28-Apr-10, 12:44

Thanks to Facebook and other social media channels, Nestlé has in recent weeks had to deal with an enormous public relations mess, the source of which lay deep in the Indonesian rainforest. But as international condemnation grows, why has the region stayed silent?

The trigger for the controversy is by now well known – an online video posted by Greenpeace featuring an office worker accidentally biting into an orangutan finger instead of a Kit Kat. The video was designed to draw attention to the NGO’s battle with Nestlé over its relationship with Indonesian company Sinar Mas Group, which has been accused of illegal deforestation of rainforests – the habitat of orangutans.

The food giant flexed its muscles and managed to get the Greenpeace video removed from YouTube, a step that angered thousands of consumers, prompting them to take on the company through Twitter and on its Facebook fan page. The inept handling of social media channels by a Nestlé representative attracted a barrage of negative comments. Nestlé has since admitted it has learnt a big lesson from its social media ineptness and accepted that that it is still “learning about how best to use social media”.

But while the incident has inflamed online passions in the West, it does not seem to have affected the average Asian consumer too much. The two largest producers of palm oil globally – Indonesia and Malaysia – have been relatively unaffected by the controversy, with no serious protests covered in the local media or in the social media space. And although Nestlé has been forced to bow to international online pressure, the incident has so far had little impact on palm oil production or indeed government legislation in these two countries.

Read More

The Indonesian social media gold rush

Wrote this posting below for Talking Points. Tried detailing the development of Indonesia’s social media scene from about a decade ago until today when every huckster in town, their cousin and their dog, is repositioning themselves as social media experts and consultants. It is as if there’s a social media gold rush in Indonesia.

All of a sudden everyone’s woken up to the fact that social media is where the action is in communications but few people really understand how it works. If you are a marketing executive, how would you be able to tell the difference between a sham social media consultant and the Real McCoy?

Read the article below to find out.

The Indonesian Social Media Bandwagon

November 30th, 2009 | No Comments »

Posted in English, Ideas, PR & Communications, Social Media, Trends | Edit |

The ever entertaining Wicaksono, aka Ndoro Kakung, has written a post (below) that captures the gold-rush fever atmosphere among marketing communications purveyors, including advertising and PR consultants, to cash in on the Social Media craze in Indonesia.

Indonesia began embracing social media in the form of blogs more than 10 years ago with a few pioneers such as Enda Nasution, Priyadi, Josef Ardi, Paman Tyo and Fatih Syuhud….

via admin | Maverick Indonesia.

Teachers are doing it for themselves – on the Net

How do you help increase the quality of education in Indonesia?

Well, if you’re Citibank, (disclosure: they are our clients and we helped in this project) one way is to help set up a forum where teachers can help themselves, learn from each other and discus ideas.

And this was what Citi did in conjunction with their NGO partner, HOPE Indonesia.

The Aksi Guru website

Yesterday, as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility efforts under the Citi Peka unbrella, Citi among other things launched the website aksiguru.org that it says is probably the first of its kind in Indonesia aimed at supporting teachers’ peer-development and student outreach.

It says high school teachers in Indonesia can, through aksiguru.org, embrace social media as a means of communication and a tool that has the potential to facilitate information and experience sharing among the education community. Through the site, teachers can exchange ideas and thoughts, and most importantly interact with their students most of whom are already tech-savvy.  Citi, in is media release, added:

“We hope to boost teachers peer development by launching the Aksiguru.org website,” said Charles Ham, Country Director Yayasan Hope Indonesia. “The use of internet and social media as a means for widespread communication is remains relatively low among teachers in the country, and we hope to generate teachers’ interest and eagerness in sharing their creative teaching methods with others though this site,” he continued.

“We have seen Indonesian teachers’ ability to create interesting learning activities continues to grow over based on the 4,448 proposals CSF received in the past seven years. Now is time for these teachers to inspire one another through Aksiguru.org,” says Ditta Amahorseya, Director-Country Corporate Affairs Head, Citi Indonesia “We hope for CSF grant recipients and other high school teachers become role models for each other and their respective schools as well as pioneer education methods that are innovative, creative, and inspiring.”

As with so many sites utilizing social media these days aksiguru.org also uses Twitter and Facebook to amplify its messages.

From the response so far, it looks like teachers are taking to this new form of cooperation, co-learning and collaboration.

Related information:

Pendidikan dan guru 2.0

Guru Kreatif

Mengajar Lewat Blog by Ndoro Kakung

 

 

 

 

 

Facebook wars over KPK

Forget Mafia Wars. This is infinitely more gripping. Besides it’s a real conflict involving the institutions that have the whole nation agog over the past few days and easily accessible through your Facebook account.

See how social media is being used — either in a concerted way by organizations or spontaneously by individuals — in the KPK-Police/Attorney General’s Office confrontation. This is an episode which is made all the more interesting because the Vice President of Indonesia @boediono has Twittered to ask who this Evan is. Go figure! (Why is the VP asking for information on Twitter when the intelligence services should be at his beck and call?)

The screen grab below is from the posting of a contact in Facebook. Apparently Evan is a Brimob member who had a posting in his Facebook page saying “Polri does not need society but society needs Polri…forward with the Indonesian Police, bury alive the small geckos…”

The response from one other Facebooker (below) was  a posting with screen grabs of Evan’s Facebook with lots of contacts “tagged” with the following comment: “This is Evan Brimob who is arrogant and opposes the citizenry, degrading healthy thinking and contemptuous of the defense of the truth. Spread this photo and search Evan Brimob and send him a message that his arrogance will unleash the people’s antipathy toward the police who have already exposed their rottenness”.

How will this play out? Log into your Facebook account and find out…

Evan

Jobs for the bloggies and social media types

One of the things we told participants at Maverick’s  PR and New Media Workshop on Tuesday this week was that we had a feeling that there would be many developments in new media in Indonesia and overseas this year. It looks like this prediction is coming to pass.

One of Unspun‘s friends recently sent him an email where Yahoo is looking for a country editor for Indonesia. I’ve attached the email at the bottom of this posting for anyone interested in the position.

In the meantime, the venerable New York Times, has taken a huge step into cyberspace with the appointment of its first “social media editor”. Here’s a clip of the story that appeared in The Jakarta Globe today:

NYT

As each day passes, it becomes ever more evident that social media – yes blogs, Twitter, plurk, Facebook…- has to be taken seriously, or at least cannot be ignored.

The question to Indonesian companies is: what are you doing about it, assuming that you have any idea at all what social media is all about? Continue reading “Jobs for the bloggies and social media types”