Tag: Taiping

A journey back in time to Taiping

Time distorts, and its greatest distortion, more than 30 years after I left Taiping where I spent my childhood and teenage years,  was in the dimensions of the house I grew up in.

It had seemed so large when I was a boy. The rooms and garden that I had wandered through in the spacious idleness of youth now looks small, even toyish. Back then, time and space seemed to stretch on forever. Now, not only the space seems constricted but the passing time also seemes compressed.

Nonetheless it was a pleasure to see that the old house was still standing stolid against time. The house, on Cator Avenue, which was subsequently renamed Jalan Panglima, had been built by the British. My father was particularly proud of that fact, partly because it was British built and, I suspect, partly because he could purchase something that had been built by the Brits. It was in the early 1960s when he bought the house, and there was that strong residue of colonial admiration/antipathy in most things.

Time had also shrunk the road leading to my house, making it look narrow. My neighbors houses had also taken on different appearances since I last saw them. Some had become decrepit, others abandoned, others passed on to children or sold off to strangers. Some looked like they have had a new lease of life breathed into them through renovations, others looked sad and forlorn, marking time before inevitable decay.

Apart from that, however, the other aspects about Taiping seemed pretty much intact, with very few changes in the past three decades. The significant change is that they now have a Tesco and  a Giant supermarket . And trafffic lights. Otherwise Burmese Pool remains much as it was, bouldered with rushing water and refreshing with a smell that is a mix of water vapor and decay of the forest.


Something’s that changed, however, is Coronation Pool, at the foothill of Maxwell’s Hill. They’ve tarted up the place and it nowhas modern pools. I tried to get in to get a look but the ticket collector would not let me in unless I paid. He did give me a spiel on how it was the only pool in Malaysia with pure water from the hills that is devoid of chlorine that makes your hair difficult to manage, your eyes sore and your skin itchy. So they now have a sales pitch as well.

The spiffed up Coronation Pool. Cold green water from the hills

One institution that’s remained is Ah Lan Che’s chicken noodles. It’s now in a shoplot with the official name of Restoran Kakak on Jalan Pasar but the food and many of the waiters there still remain the same, even after four decades. It’s still one of the most popular breakfast hangouts in Taiping, harkening back to a time that is Pre-Starbucks.

The government offices, dating back to colonial times are still there. And the Lake Gardens remain pristine in its beauty (see previous post).

From Colonial times
One of the loveliest sights in Malaysia, the Taiping Lake Gardens
Even the prison reeks of history, having been built in 1879

The railway station, however, has come in for huge changes. Malaysia is in the throes of building a dual track high speed railway from north to south. Apparently the initial plan was to do away with the over a century-old railway station (that constitutes one end of the first railway line in Malaya). But after there were some protests they decided to build the new railway lines some distance behind the railway station, leaving the building intact.

This was one end of Malaya's first railway line

The Taiping market remains very much as it was when I was a boy. The century-old steel and wood building still stands, looking a bit decrepit but still serviceable. It is roomy, airy and seen much history.

 

One feature that still survives and is quite remarkable considering the price of things these days are the pork-seller’s stalls. Made of concrete, these stalls are unique in that they have huge solid marble slabs for tops. My sister and I could not help wonder what the marble slabs alone would cost these days.

Most expensive pork stall table tops?

 

My old secondary school, St George’s, has seen few changes but one major change is that it’s now all locked up in the weekends, with the only access through the main gate with a sentry. Its a testament of times and innocence lost. Once you could stroll into the school compound at will through three or four unguarded gates. Go there to meet friends, play basketball or just to wander through its storied halls. But no more. I guess they have theft, drug addicts, child predators and other ills of modern life to deal with these days.

St George's institution. You used to be able to walk in there anytime and there's be a familiar face, an old teacher

One institution nearby is Ansari’s, home to very delish cendol, pasembor (rujak to KL-ites) and  the best gandum. The cendol and pasembor are still there but unfortunately they’ve stopped serving the gandum.

Cendol and pasembor still there. Unfortunatley no more gandum.

One thing that seems to have changed, and this seems to be a common theme throughout Malaysia, is in the sense of security. Speaking to friends who still live there, you get the impression that everyone’s a little afraid for the own safety. We were treated to lots of stories of Indian gangs extorting and robbing residents. It seems that some Malaysians of Indian origin, a group has had a rough time economically in Malaysia, have  resorted to gangsterism and crime to make a living. The Indians are now apparently leading Triads and extortion rackets.

In spite of the changes, however, Taiping still remains quintessentially the small town I grew up in. Two days is too short a time to visit the place and Unspun plans to bring the wife and the Unspunlet there for a longer stay the next time. There is still the Zoo, the temple with the dometicated wild boars, Austin pool, Maxwells Hill and other favorite haunts to rediscover.

Oh yeah, there was also the oddly named store. Imagine sleeping on Simony or in the Mlay-ised spelling Simoni.

Sleep on this

The Allah issue in Malaysia: Look South

This Allah issue in Malaysia is getting ridiculous and dangerous – the latest developments include the firebombings of churches in Taiping.

Ironically Taiping, where Unspun grew up in the state of Perak in Malaysia, is means “Great Peace” in Chinee. It was given the name after a bloody civil war between rival Hokkien and Cantonese migrants in the tin trade. For many years since Taiping has enjoyed the serenity of its namesake and the biggest action in town when Unspun was growing up was when they installed traffic lights in the road junctions.

The firebombings last week has destroyed whatever Great Peace Taiping seems to have had. Perhaps it is a sign of the times.

Allah is used freely by all denominations in Indonesia without widespread defection of Muslims to other religions. Why is Malaysia so different?

In this entire hoo ha one question that needs to e asked is what is the role of the Malaysian Government playing in all this? If you will recall, it was the Malaysian Government that triggered the issue in the first place when the Home Minister forbade  the Catholic Church to use the word Allah in its newsletter Herald.

When the Church successfully challenged the order in the Malaysian High Court, the Malaysian Government said it would appeal, and it did on the grounds that if the Catholics were allowed to use the word Allah there MIGHT be racial conflict.

The problem with prophecies is that they tend to be self-fulfilling. So did the Malaysian Government inadvertently suggest the idea of racial conflict or was it cynically prescient in predicting the future?

This is a question worth thinking about. But while pondering about this, what to do about the genie that is being let out of the bottle with the firebombings of the churches in KL and Taiping?

Here Malaysians should Look South and learn from the Indonesians about religious harmony. When there were riots in 1997 the more responsible Muslim groups not only did not partake in the destruction of churches and calling for calm, they actively form brigades to guard against the violent attacks of their fellow muslims against churches. How cool is that?

And for those, like the Malaysian Government, who advance the idiotic argument that the use of the word Allah by other religious groups would encourage Muslims to change their religions, they should also Look South to Indonesia, the most populous Muslim country in the world where over 90 percent of its residents have been and remain Muslims.

Here churches use Allah freely in their sermons and  in the Bibles they use, Muslims do not whip themselves into a fervor if Muslims decide to change religions, and Allah is just another word for God, whether they are of Christian, Muslim or other persuasions. And the result? No widespread defection of Muslims to other religions. Go figure!

What’s going on?

There was a time when Unspun was proud to call Malaysia home. Unspun loved Taiping, the town he grew up in, the rainforests that surrounded it, the hikes up Maxwell’s hills, swims at Burmese and Austin Pools, romancing Convent girls

lake-gardens.jpg

on bicycles at Lake Gardens, lepaking at Wai Sek Kai, trying to catch a glimpse of the prostitutes and their clients in the Taiping Hotel just across the road from Unspun‘s school (but never succeeding)…those were innocent, halcyon days where a kid could do just what kids were meant to do without being in fear of pedophiles, snatch thieves, kidnappers and rampaging Mat Rempits.

bike.jpgIn 1980s Unspun left Malaysia after Operasi Lallang and never went back to work in Malaysia. But for many years it occupied a special place in Unspun‘s heart — and stomach (until today Unspun thinks that Malaysian food is the best). Malaysia was like an estranged lover. Unspun could not live with her but still missed her.

Over the past few years, this began to change. After being in Indonesia for 10 years Unspun began to feel more comfortable and at home with Indonesians rather than Malaysians. The worst was a few weeks ago during a buka puasa function with Malaysians. Apart from one or two people there Unspun just could not relate to the crowd. They had such different priorities, these expatriate Malaysians who are still very much rooted to Malaysia. (more…)